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#applifam26jul is live at the @applifam profile link! 🎨 Theme Suggestions: 1⃣ Play 2⃣ Do it another way 3⃣ share a moment from your day 4⃣ Rockets & Firework display 5⃣ anything that rhymes with clay 🎨 Photo taken in @TrouvilleSurMer by @jvdt for #tsm_esas 🎨 Themes are only suggested. Edit as you want. Cite sources and respect copyright please. 🎨🌟🎨

applifam:

#applifam26jul is live at the @applifam profile link! 🎨 Theme Suggestions: 1⃣ Play 2⃣ Do it another way 3⃣ share a moment from your day 4⃣ Rockets & Firework display 5⃣ anything that rhymes with clay 🎨 Photo taken in @TrouvilleSurMer by @jvdt for #tsm_esas 🎨 Themes are only suggested. Edit as you want. Cite sources and respect copyright please. 🎨🌟🎨

Beloved British Artist Ralph Steadman Illustrates the Life of Leonardo da Vinci
by Maria Popova at Brainpickings
A visual “autobiography” of the legendary polymath that grants equal dignity to the grit and the glory.
Freud once observed that the great Renaissance polymath Leonardo da Vinciwas “like a man who awoke too early in the darkness, while the others were all still asleep.” And how blazingly awake he was — his Vitruvian Manendures as one of the most iconic images of all time, his visionary anatomical illustrations changed the course of modern medicine, and he knew how to play the long game of the creative life.
Perhaps this is why in the early 1980s, when he was in his mid-forties, the celebrated British cartoonist Ralph Steadman developed a great obsession with Leonardo. He began to paint the polymath’s fanciful inventions, as well as countless drawings of Leonardo himself, and eventually even travelled to Italy to stand where Leonardo stood, seeking to envision what it was like to inhabit that endlessly imaginative mind and boundless spirit.

Beloved British Artist Ralph Steadman Illustrates the Life of Leonardo da Vinci

by  at Brainpickings

A visual “autobiography” of the legendary polymath that grants equal dignity to the grit and the glory.

Freud once observed that the great Renaissance polymath Leonardo da Vinciwas “like a man who awoke too early in the darkness, while the others were all still asleep.” And how blazingly awake he was — his Vitruvian Manendures as one of the most iconic images of all time, his visionary anatomical illustrations changed the course of modern medicine, and he knew how to play the long game of the creative life.

Perhaps this is why in the early 1980s, when he was in his mid-forties, the celebrated British cartoonist Ralph Steadman developed a great obsession with Leonardo. He began to paint the polymath’s fanciful inventions, as well as countless drawings of Leonardo himself, and eventually even travelled to Italy to stand where Leonardo stood, seeking to envision what it was like to inhabit that endlessly imaginative mind and boundless spirit.